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Optimizing for RPA Value

Eric Keeney

Here at Amitech we have been putting a lot of focus and energy into our RPA practice. As such, we recently conducted some research on keywords used in searches for RPA topics. A notable observation jumped out at us while reviewing the analysis. First, a bit of an explanation on some SEO terminology for context: Search volume is a common SEO metric, but in addition to that a key metric used in SEO is “difficulty.” 

The difficulty metric for a keyword speaks to how much “search engineering” (just made that term up) is behind a keyword. In short, the difficulty measures how much competition there is for a keyword. By targeting low difficulty keywords, one has a greater probability of appearing higher in the list for that keyword associated with your marketing efforts.  

Ok, SEO lesson over. Here’s what we found: We saw a lot of searches for things related to the technical aspects of RPA like tools, solutions, technology, etc… “RPA Tools,” “IT automation,” and “Automation solutions” were some of the top keywords by the volume measure. And, as one would expect, we saw a lot effort put into the optimization of these technical keywords based on the high difficulty scores for them. 

What we didn’t see was a similar amount of effort put into optimization for keywords that one can typically associate with the business value that automation can provide. Terms like “advisor” or “benefits” or “use cases” had significantly lower difficulty scores, even though there was decent search volume for these keywords. We think this observation is very telling about the RPA market today, where vendors are positioning themselves and what the market is focusing on.

At Amitech, we see our focus on the business value of automation as a key differentiator—something that people are looking for from partners. However, based on the low difficulty scores, automation vendors and implementers are not putting the same optimization efforts into those keywords that one could associate with business value. To us, that says our competitors aren’t focusing on that, or may not be capable of delivering that. 

So, we will leave you with this, watch who you work with and look to find a partner that will focus on the value and outcome for your business rather than just the technical implementation of a tool. If you’re interested in learning more about the value of RPA or how our approach differs from other providers, give me a shout!